Elderly Exemptions

There are three types of tax exemptions for the elderly, available through the Assessor?s office. They are referenced by their state law clause number; Clause 17D, Clause 41A and 41C. Each of the clauses have different restrictions and qualifications for receiving the exemption amount. Age is not the only factor. The higher the exemption amount, the more strict the qualifications. All applicants are required to support their application with documentation and all applications are reviewed.
Below are outlined the qualifications for each of the exemptions.

Clause 17D
Exemption Application Form
Elderly, Surviving Spouses, Minor whose father is deceased
Exemption amount: $245.071
An applicant for the Elderly category must be 70 years of age by July 1st of the application (tax) year.
An applicant for Surviving Spouses or a Minor whose father is deceased does not have an age limitation.
All applicant must have owned and occupied the property on which the exemption is being filed for the past 5 consecutive years.
The total of all property value (excluding the domicile), plus personal property (ie value of cars), monies in the bank, stocks, bonds, tax-free accounts etc. cannot exceed $49,9681.
Note 1: These are FY2007 values. They are adjusted for inflation annually (ref IGRs 03-205, 04-206, 05-206 & 06-207)
Clause 41C (&D)
Exemption Application Form
Elderly
Exemption amount: $1000.
The applicant must be 65 years of age by July 1st of the tax year.
The applicant must have owned and occupied the property on which the exemption is being filed for the past 5 consecutive years.
All sources of income (wages, recent income, social security, spouses social security, pension, spouses pension, bank interest and dividends, tax-free interest, etc.) minus a deductible minimum (which is determined yearly by the Department of Revenue), must not exceed $22,8341&2 if single or $34,2521&2 if married. If the property is jointly owned by an individual other than the spouse, the total estate of each joint owner cannot exceed the $22,8341&2.
The total of income producing property value (excluding the domicile), plus personal property (ie value of cars), monies in the bank, stocks, bonds, tax-free accounts, value on other real estate property, etc. cannot exceed $45,6691 for singles or $62,7961 for married3.
Note 1: These are FY2007 values. They are adjusted for inflation annually (ref IGRs 02-209, 03-205, 04-206, 05-206, 06-207 & ATM2002 Art#22)Note 2: The following amounts should be added to the income limits for those who received income from Social Security, Railroad Retirement or from government pensions. Worker = $3,692; Spouse = $1,847; or both = $5,539. (These figures will be pro-rated if less than a full year. [IGRs 04-204, 04-205, 05-205 & 06-207])Note 3: Special situations apply to non-married co-owners. The total income of each joint owner can not exceed $14,842 if single and $17,126 if married, and a co-owner estate may not exceed the limit of $31,968 if single and $34,252 if married. Please consult with Assessor’s office if this applies to your situation (IGR 02-209).
Clause 41A
Exemption Application 41A
Tax Deferral
Exemption amount: up to the total liability
The applicant must be 65 years of age by July 1st of the tax year.
The applicant must have owned and occupied the property on which the exemption is being filed for the past 5 consecutive years.
The applicant and joint owners and mortgagees enter into a deferral and recovery agreement. This Agreement is recorded as a lien upon the property at the Registry of Deeds. The filing fees and 2%1 interest per annum is part of the total amount to be recovered.
The income from all sources as listed above under Clause 41A must not exceed $40,0002 .
Note 1: Changed from 8% per article 17 on the FY07 Town meeting (May 2006).Note 2: Approved by Annual Town meeting, Article 22, 21 May 2007.